GGPThe Generations & Gender Programme

Contact details:

Prof. dr. A.C. Liefbroer
Postbus 11650 2502 AR 'S-GRAVENHAGE
Sublocations:
Afdeling Sociologie, Faculteit der Sociale Wetenschappen, Erasmus Universiteit Rotterdam, Afdeling Methoden en Statistiek, Faculteit Sociale Wetenschappen, Universiteit Utrecht, Basiseenheid Demografie, Faculteit Ruimtelijke Wetenschappen, Rijksuniversiteit Groningen, Sector Demografische en Sociaal-Economische Statistieken, Centraal Bureau voor de Statistiek, Den Haag

The Generations and Gender Programme (GGP) collects and distributes data on how relationships between the young and old and between men and women in Europe and other developed countries are changing. It aims at generating scientific breakthroughs in our understanding of how societal changes (population ageing, economic change, policy changes) impact on individual life courses and family relationships. It does so by collecting top-quality individual-level survey data complemented by relevant macro-level information. It covers the whole adult life course, therefore allowing the longitudinal and cross-national study of family life and generational relationships from early adulthood to older ages.

The Generations and Gender Programme (GGP), launched in 2001, collects and distributes data on
how relationships between the young and old and between men and women in Europe and other
developed countries are changing. It aims at generating scientific breakthroughs in our
understanding of how societal changes (population ageing, economic change, policy changes) impact
on individual life courses and family relationships. It does so by (a) collecting top quality individuallevel
survey data on topics such as partnership formation and dissolution, fertility, and
intergenerational solidarity, (b) by harmonizing these data into a comparative database, and (c) by
complementing these data with macro-level indicators (at the regional and national level) through a
Contextual Database. Importantly, the GGP covers the whole adult life-course, between the age of
18 and 79, and is therefore the only international research infrastructure dedicated to the
longitudinal and cross-national study of family life and generational relationships from early
adulthood to older ages.
Until now, the GGP has disseminated individual-level data on more than 200,000 respondents in 19
participating countries. In addition, GGP-like information from a number of additional countries has
been harmonized and released as well. These data are used by over 3,000 users, who together form
a global GGP community.
The Netherlands plays a pivotal role in the development of the GGP Research Infrastructure (RI), as
the Netherlands Interdisciplinary Demographic Institute (NIDI-KNAW) is the coordinator and host of
the central hub of the GGP since 2009, and thus bears primary responsibility for the functioning of
the GGP RI. The pivotal role of the Netherlands is also evident from the fact that the Netherlands is
the only country with three representatives in the GGP Consortium Board (NIDI, EUR and UU). EUR
plays a major role in monitoring and developing the quality of measurement instruments regarding
intergenerational relationships. UU provides invaluable methodological expertise to the GGP. These
three institutions, plus RUG and Statistics Netherlands, are also responsible for the Dutch GGP. RUG
provides expertise on housing and family-life issues and Statistics Netherlands provides expertise in
data-collection and data-linkage. Together this partnership incorporates world-class expertise in
large-scale, longitudinal data collections and leadership in substantive research related to gender
and generations. In addition, the Netherlands Kinship Panel Study (NKPS) (which was the original
Dutch contribution to the GGP), has been a source of inspiration on which much of the substantive
and methodological developments of the GGP has been modeled.
The GGP is expected to have a major impact on science and policymaking. From a science
perspective, it answers key questions related to the relationships between genders and between
generations, including how macro-level conditions (institutions, economy, norms) shape, mitigate,
or contribute to inequalities between genders and generations, and why these relationships differ
across countries. From a policy perspective, the GGP informs both policy makers and the general
public about the challenges and possible responses related to the increasing complexity, fluidity, and
inequalities between genders and generations.

Connection to strategic developments
Topsectors:
ESFRI:
Faciliteit
Sociale en culturele innovatie